Recruiting – The Offer

offer pyramidToday is the fifth of a six-part series designed to help student-athletes and their parents know what to expect at the various stages of the recruiting process.  I briefly explained these stages in the post, Recruiting – Gauging Their Level Of Interest; this series goes into greater detail at each step, helping you maximize every opportunity to market yourself.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

The previous post in this series can be found on my blog at the following link: Recruiting – The Level of Interest Pyramid.  This post will discuss “The Offer” and detail exactly what the verbal offer of scholarship aid means.

At some point during the recruiting process, the school (or schools) that has been recruiting you will make a decision.  They will either decide that you do not fit the current needs of their program, or that you are the type of student athlete that will be successful in their program.

If their decision is that you do not meet their current needs, understand their decision does not necessarily mean you cannot be a collegiate football player.  It only means that you do not meet the needs of that specific program, at that specific time.

If their decision is that you DO meet their needs, their next step will be determining what type offer they will be making.  Here are some important things to remember regarding the verbal offer:

  • At all levels below FBS football, the scholarships can be broken up into partial awards, ranging anywhere from a small dollar amount to a full ride.  At the NCAA FBS level, the scholarships are all full awards.  A full scholarship can include tuition, fees, room, board and books.  If you qualify for any need based aid, such as a PELL grant, you can accept that amount on top of your scholarship award.
  • At all levels below the NCAA DI level, the scholarship awards are 1-year contracts, with the option for annual renewal.  A 2011 rule change allowed NCAA DI schools to offer multi-year awards, but even then, those are rare.  A recent study by the Pittsburg Post-Gazette found the following:

“But nearly two years after that legislation, multiyear scholarships are rare, not publicized by universities and largely unknown by the athletes. According to data of 82 universities at the Division I-A level obtained by the Post-Gazette through open records requests, only 16 have offered more than 10 multiyear scholarships. Thirty-two of the universities have offered between one and 10, and thirty-four have not offered any.”

  • If a DII school tells you that they are offering you a 4-year scholarship, they are not being completely honest.
  • The verbal scholarship offer is non-binding; it can be rescinded.  Nothing is binding until the National Letter of Intent is signed.
  • College programs will offer more scholarships than they have available, knowing that they will not “win” every recruiting battle.  Because of this, they will want to know ASAP if you intend to accept the offer… and will ask that you give a verbal commitment to them.  If you are not going to accept their offer, they know they can make an offer to the next person on their list.  Just because the college will want to know ASAP, does not mean you should feel, or be, pressured to make a decision.
  • Your verbal commitment is non-binding as well; it can be rescinded.  Nothing is binding until the National Letter of Intent is signed.

You should feel free to ask questions related to the scholarship offer:

  • Can the offer be increased from year to year?
  • How often does that happen?
  • What about my red-shirt year… will the scholarship cover a 5th year?
  • What happens to the amount of aid if I get injured and cannot play any longer?  What if I graduate in 4 years, and still have a year of eligibility… will the scholarship cover grad school?

You are getting to the final, home stretch, of the recruiting process.  You now are fairly confident in their level of interest.  It is now up to you to continue your evaluation and make your decision based on the important factors to you and your family.  You want to be confident in your decision before the next and final phase of the process, signing the National Letter of Intent.

Questions and Comments are always welcome!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Advertisements

Level of Interest Pyramid

I have had a couple of requests for links to all of the posts regarding the Level of Interest Pyramid (Recruiting – Gauging Their Level of Interest).  Following are the links, in order, for all of these posts:

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

pyramidI have also created a “Magazine” on Flipboard (see Apps for the Coach) that puts all of these posts in one location that you can read (and share) on your mobile device.  This is a link to the Flipboard Magazine:

Recruiting – Gauging Their Level of Interest

This week I will post the final two installments in this series, Recruiting – The Offer, and Recruiting – The Letter of Intent.  By the end of the summer, I will also have these in an iBook that will be free to readers of this blog.  My iBook, Wanted… and Rewarded.. the complete guide to a successful college recruiting experience, will be released in iBook format by the end of the summer as well.

Questions and Comments are always welcome!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – The Home Visit

home visitToday is the fourth of a six-part series designed to help student-athletes and their parents know what to expect at the various stages of the recruiting process.  I briefly explained these stages in the post, Recruiting – Gauging Their Level Of Interest; I will be going into greater detail at each step to help you maximize every opportunity to market yourself.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process. The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

 

Subscribe to my FREE channel with one click here:

Today I am going to discuss “The Home Visit” and what to expect when college coaches come to your home.

When a college coach, either a recruiting coach, head coach, or both, expends the time and effort to spend an evening visiting with you and your family, it indicates an extremely high level of interest.  The “Home Visit” and “Official Visit” go hand-in-hand.

When I was a coach at the University of Central Missouri, we always tried to schedule the home visit prior to the athletes “official visit”  (see post Recruiting – the Official Visit) to campus.  We seldom, if ever, did a home visit with an athlete that either was not scheduled, or at least offered, an official visit to our campus.  Typically, if we offered an official visit to an athlete, we were anticipating making some scholarship offer to them.    So athletes that we visited in person, at their home, were

  • Scheduled for an official visit, and
  • Probably getting a scholarship offer.

Why is it so important for the recruiting coach, and possibly the head coach, to come into your home to meet your family?

Your Evaluation of Them

The home visit should be important to you and your family in the evaluation process.  It may be the first (and one of the few) times that your family (parents, guardians, etc) will have individual, personal, unlimited access to the coach.  It gives you and your family another time to ask very specific questions to the coaches regarding you, your athletic and academic career, and how their college could fit with you.  Now is the time to ask the “difficult” questions:

  • What happens if I get injured?
  • What are the time requirements of the football program?
  • What kind of academic help is available?
  • What is the graduation rate of the football student-athletes?
  • How good is the degree program in my field of interest?
  • What is the placement rate in my field of study post-graduation?
  • How good is the student support of the football program?
  • What type of offer, and when can I expect the offer to me made?
  • How quick will you want a commitment?
  • How many other athletes are you recruiting at my position?
  • What is your redshirt policy?
  • Is it possible to increase the scholarship amount while in your program?
  • Will I be able to keep my Pell Grant? (if you qualify for the grant)
  • Are you planning on staying at the college during my son’s entire career?

If the coach (or coaches) do not seem clear or straight forward in answering any of your questions… if they seem like they are dodging… that should throw up a red flag.  Make note of the questions, and follow up with another coach, or follow up with current players in the program during your official visit.

Their Evaluation of You

Just as you are evaluating them, the coach(es) are continuously evaluating you, and the home visit is part of that process.  They will be observing how you interact with your family during the evening… are you respectful, considerate, courteous? You and your family can expect similar questions that you were asked at the initial school visit (see Recruiting – First Impressions).  One question that I always asked the family –

“When it comes time to make this very important decision as to where your son is going to go and spend the next 4-5 years studying, and playing football, what are the difference makers for you; what factors will separate one university and football program from the rest?”

Their Sales Pitch

The coach(es) will be operating under the assumption that your family will be helping you in the decision making process.  They will want to make sure that all of the information they have given you (the athlete), through text message, mail, email, phone and personal visit, is conveyed to your family.  The recruiting coach, and possibly the head coach, will want to “put a face” on the football program that you are considering.  Often the home visit will happen before the official visit, so the coach will want to confirm specifics regarding your (and their if they come too) visit to campus.  The main function of the home visit is to personalize and humanize the recruiting process, and demonstrate that you will be taken care of in their program.

We are getting down to the final stages of the recruiting process; the penultimate step of “The Offer” and finally signing the “Letter of Intent”.  Details of these steps will come in the next couple of weeks.

The way to get to this point… keep working hard … and remember,

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you… Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Scrutiny

twitterI want to make this as clear as possible.  If you are being recruited, or have hopes of being recruited, to play college sports, everything you do will be evaluated.  You will be under intense scrutiny – and typically the better the program, the better the recruiters, the more intense this scrutiny will be.  I have already discussed how the evaluation will continue when the coach visits you at school (First Impressions) , and during your official visit (The Official Visit) .  Another area that you are being watched in, is Social Media.

tweetIf you are on Facebook and are being recruited, the coaching staff will check to see what you have been posting.  If you are on Twitter, they will check your tweets.  They will use Twitter to broadcast information to you, but will also check to see what you are tweeting about.  The college and football program is making a big investment in you , and they want to make sure they have done their due diligence regarding not only your physical ability, also your character.  Stories surface daily about coaches and programs that have dropped players because of poor decisions they make and then post about.

Most programs continue to monitor their athlete’s social media accounts during their career on campus.  The unfolding situation at Columbia University has shown this. I suppose there are two factor involved here… making poor decision AND compounding the poor decision by posting or tweeting about it.  If you make good decisions, you will have little to worry about.

Bottom line again – If you are being recruited, or have hopes of being recruited, everything you do will be evaluated.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – The Official Visit

Today is the third of a six-part series designed to help student-athletes and their parents know what to expect at the various stages of the recruiting process.  I briefly explained these stages in the post, Recruiting – Gauging Their Level Of Interest; I will be going into greater detail at each step to help you maximize every opportunity to market yourself.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

Today I am going to discuss the level regarding the “Official Visit” and what to expect during your time on an NCAA campus.

offer visit pyramidWhen an NCAA school offers you an “Official Visit”, this indicates a very high level of interest.  An “Official Visit” is one where the college or university is paying for you (and your parents) to travel and visit their campus.  Colleges normally will have you (and your parents) spend the night, feed you, pay travel expenses, give you tickets to games, etc.  All this is legal (to a point) and what most colleges will do regarding Official Visits.

A typical itinerary for an Official Visit is highly choreographed and will  probably look something like this:

Day 1

  • 8:00 AM – Arrive on Campus, met by Recruiting Coach
  • 8:30 AM – Greeting and introduction of Staff by Head Coach
  • 9:00 AM – Tour of Campus – Led by Football Hostess
  • 10:15 AM – Tour of Athletic Facilities – Led by Coach
  • 11:30 AM – Lunch at Student Union with Coaching Staff
  • 1:00 PM – Meeting with Professor in you area of Academic Interest
  • 2:00 PM – Meeting and Presentation by Strength Coach
  • 3:30 PM – Change clothes for Testing
  • 4:00 PM – Physical Testing (225 lb bench rep test, Vertical Leap, 40 yard dash, Pro Agility Shuttle, possibly position specific drills -Division I football cannot test or tryout )
  • 5:30 PM – Change for Dinner
  • 6:00 PM – Transported to Dinner with Coaching Staff at a local restaurant.
  • 7:00 PM – Back to Football Complex – introduction of player hosts
  • 7:30 PM – Attend Basketball Game on Campus
  • 10:00 PM – Free Time with player hosts

Day 2

  • 7:30 AM – Breakfast at Student Union
  • 8:30 AM – Meet with position Coach
  • 9:00 AM – Meet with Coordinator
  • 9:30 AM – Meet with Head Coach
  • 10:00 AM – Depart Campus

Keep these two things in mind.

  1. The official visit is highly choreographed by the university and the coaching staff to put their institution and football program in the best possible light.
  2. You are being evaluated the whole time you are on campus.  You not only will be evaluated on your physical testing results, but also on how you handle yourself during the entire visit.  The head coach will get feedback from every coach you meet with, and also from the professor you met with, the football hostesses that gave your campus tour, and your player host.  They will want to know how you conducted yourself, the type of questions you asked, and your responses to questions.  They will want to know if you are the type of student-athlete that will fit in and be successful academically in school and in their football program.

During the visit there will be times that you are with your parents, times that you are alone, and times when you will be with other players.  This is done intentionally.  The coaching staff will want to see how you will act without parental guidance in these situations.  Your parents will not be there to watch over and answer questions for you while you are in school.   Typically, you will not be staying in the same hotel or campus room as your parents.   A hotel room will be provided for your parents, and you will be rooming with another prospective student athlete.

The Official Visit is also a great opportunity for you to continue evaluating their university and football program.  It is an excellent time to find out what the coaching staff and football program is REALLY like.  You will have time to spend with current student-athletes without coaches around.  During the recruiting process, it is easy for a coach to “sell” themselves and their football program.  They will tell you the good stuff.

Make sure to have questions ready for your academic advisor.

  • What types of jobs are available in my major field?
  • What is the placement rate for jobs in my field after graduation?
  • What kind of extra help is available in I need it?
  • What is the graduation rate of student-athletes at this university?

Make sure to have questions ready for the coaching staff.

  • How many players are currently at my position group?
  • How do I compare athletically to the current players in my position group?
  • How many people are you currently recruiting in my position group?
  • How many JC athletes do you recruit and sign each year?
  • What is your philosophy regarding redshirting?
  • Do you have required study time for athletes?

Make sure to have questions ready for the current players.

  • How is the head coach?
  • What kind of coach is my position coach?
  • How do they treat the players?
  • Are they interested in me academically?
  • What will a typical day look like in season?
  • What is the off-season program like?
  • How do they treat injured players?
  • How is the food on campus?

college recruiting ebookThe Official Visit is one of the last, and most important pieces of the recruiting process.  Things are getting very serious regarding the school’s interest in you as a prospective student-athlete. Normally colleges will not spend the time, money, or energy bringing a prospect on campus for an Official Visit if they are not planning to invest some scholarship aid in that athlete.  Make sure you maximize this time you spend on campus, both in marketing yourself, and evaluating the interested school.

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – Texts, Emails, and Phone Calls

Today is the second of a six part series designed to help student-athletes and their parents know what to expect at the various stages of the recruiting process.  I briefly explained these stages in the post, Recruiting – Gauging Their Level Of Interest;  I will be going into greater detail at each step to help you maximize each of these opportunities to market yourself.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

 

When I initially designed the “Level of Interest Pyramid” I distinguished the difference between email or text messages, and phone calls.  At that point in time (prior to January 2013) the NCAA considered these as separate categories and had different rules governing each.  In January 2013, the NCAA changed their rules governing these communications, essentially grouping them together and eliminating the numerical limits on both.

level of interestAs far as gauging a level of interest a school has in a prospect, there is still significant difference between a text message or email, and a phone call.  A text or email message does indicate that the recruiting coach is in the process of developing a relationship with you.  A text or email message does indicate a higher level of interest.  But, texts or emails can still me done “en masse”.  Any elementary student with a cell phone knows how to send a group email or text message and knows how to copy and paste parts of one email into another.  A phone call is different.

When a college coach takes the time to actually call you and talk on the phone, it is an indication of a fairly high level of interest.  It is something that has to be done individually and is unique to you.  You cannot do it in a group, or copy and paste like you can with email or text.  Things are getting serious at this level!

Your responses to text, email, or phone calls will be important.  Remember, the recruiting coach is still evaluating you at this juncture, and will be right up until the point in time that you sign your National LOI (Letter of Intent).  Some suggestions.

  • Your response to text or email should be relatively brief. Keep in mind that this coach is probably actively recruiting 30 or more athletes at this point in the process.
  • Make sure your response casts you in a positive light, and honestly conveys your level of interest.
  • Be careful of your language and keep the communications mature and “professional”.
  • Be mindful of the nature of text or email – sometimes your emotions or intended meaning can be misconstrued.  The coach does not have your voice inflection or facial expressions to give him cues as to what you are saying or what you are meaning.

More than likely these texts or emails from your recruiting coach will be “light” in nature – probably just asking things like “How did your game go?”, “How is your week going?”  “Good luck on your Spanish test” etc.  The main thing that the coach is trying to convey is that they are interested in you.

When you get a phone call from your recruiting coach keep these things in mind.  Speak clearly and confidently.  Be prepared for some questions –

  • Have you heard from any other colleges?
  • Have you set up any official visits?
  • Has any college made an offer to you?
  • Do you have any questions about our football program or college?

If you do have any questions that have come up since they visited you in person at school, or your parent(s) have questions, now is the time to ask them.  Remember this – unless the coach specifically asks to speak with your parent, you be the one to talk.  A coach wants to know you are mature enough, and independent enough to speak for yourself.  They will want to talk directly to you, not your parent, uncle, or a friend who is acting as your “agent

I also think it is important to communicate any limits you (or your parents) want to set regarding these communications.  If the recruiting coach knows that you only want to hear from him via text or email once a week, or not after a particular time at night, then it should be respected. Make sure that the limit you are setting for one coach, you set for all the coaches that are recruiting you.  All of the coaches and all of the colleges that are recruiting you will want there to be a “level playing field”.

college recruiting ebookUse all of these mediums (email, text and phone call) to help get you one step closer to making an informed decision as to where you would like to get your education and participate in intercollegiate athletics.  Use it wisely, too, as part of an overall marketing plan – helping to make you Wanted…. and Rewarded!

 

Thanks for the comments and questions – keep ’em coming!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – First Impressions

Today is the first of a six part series designed to help student-athletes and their parents know what to expect at the various stages of the recruiting process. I briefly explained these stages in the post, Recruiting – Gauging Their Level Of Interest; I will be going into greater detail at each step to help you maximize each of these opportunities to market yourself.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

 

pyramidToday’s post will detail the first in person contact the recruiting coach will make with you at school. This is the third of nine levels on the “Interest Pyramid”. To get to this level, your coach will have already recommended you as a player that he feels has the potential to play college football. You are on the college’s list as a potential player, and have probably already begun receiving information from them and filled out a questionnaire. The coaching staff at the college has probably already requested video tape, and this has been evaluated by at least the recruiting coach, and possibly by the position coach and head coach at the college as well.

During the Fall, after this initial evaluation has been completed, college coaches will start making the rounds and begin their in person visits with the prospective student athletes at their school. Typically, coaches will only do a face to face visit with players they believe have a chance of being a scholarship athlete in their program. It is an indication of a higher level of interest, but still not a true indication of their final intent.

Normally, college coaches will schedule this meeting through your high school coach, but may also email or phone you to set up the time. Often, the coaches will come unannounced, so being prepared for this initial “job interview” is important.

Approach this meeting as a job interview… a very important job interview. As the saying goes, “you only have one chance to make a first impression” – consider what you want this first impression to be. Make no mistake about this; the college recruiting coach will be continually evaluating you during this meeting, and through all of the remaining recruiting process. They are making a decision on whom to invest a significant amount of time and money into, and they want to be correct.

meyer-ohioWhen this meeting takes place there should be two simultaneous “sells” taking place. The recruiting coach (if he is good) will for sure begin the process of selling his university and football program to you. At the same time, you should begin selling yourself as the best possible investment their football program could make in a student-athlete. Here are some suggestions on how to successfully do that.

If the meeting has been arranged with your knowledge, and it is not unannounced, there are a couple of things you can do to prepare:

  • Dress nice – you don’t have to wear a suit and tie, but dress to impress. I was once told by a head college coach that he “always wanted to hear if any of the prospective student athletes were wearing any f**k you kind of T-shirts.”
  • Do some research on the school so you will be prepared to ask intelligent questions. Be familiar with the schools location, conference, record, etc.

Even if the meeting is unannounced, here are some things you can work on now to begin preparing yourself for any meeting, with any coach at any time.

The coach WILL ask you some questions; be prepared for these. Here are some to expect, some that I asked when I was recruiting:

  • They will check the basic info they have on you, including phone, email, address, parents name, etc.
  • What are you interested in studying?
  • What are you interested in doing as a career?
  • Do you have any hobbies?
  • What position would you prefer playing in college?
  • What other schools have been in to talk to you?
  • Do you have any “official” visits set up? If so, where?
  • When it comes time to make this very important decision as to where you are going to go and spend the next 4-5 years studying, and playing football, whom are you going to be looking towards for guidance and direction? Who will help you make this decision?
  • When it comes time to make this very important decision as to where you are going to go and spend the next 4-5 years studying, and playing football, what are the difference makers for you; what factors will separate one university and football program from the rest?

Make sure to answer the questions honestly, but also know the recruiting coach will be using your answers to these questions (if he is good) to individually tailor his “sell” to your needs and wants.

The coach WILL ask you if you have any questions. Be prepared for this – there is little that is as unimpressive as someone who just sits like a bump on a log, and little as impressive as someone who asks some good, thoughtful questions. Don’t think you have to find out everything at this initial meeting – there is plenty of time. But do have a couple of questions handy that you are ready to ask.

Here are some possible questions to ask at this meeting – add any based on factors important to you:

  • Type of offense (defense)
  • How long has head coach been at school?
  • How long has position coach been at school?
  • Degree programs they are noted for?
  • Graduation Rate?
  • Redshirt philosophy?
  • Ask the number and grade level of players at your position?
  • Where do you see me fitting into your offense (or defense)?
  • How is student support for the program?
  • How is your Strength and Conditioning program? Do you have a full time (or two) Strength and Conditioning coach?

Here are some general “rules” on how to impress at this meeting:

  • Be on time.
  • Begin the meeting with a firm handshake.
  • Introduce yourself.
  • Make eye contact, with him and speak clearly and with confidence.
  • Address him as Coach (last name)
  • No food, gum or candy.
  • The coach will probably have some collateral marketing material from university and/or football program. Depending on the level, NCAA FBS, FCS, DII, DIII or NAIA it could be a game day program or a football media guide along with a college view book. Thank him for the material, but put it aside to look at later. Don’t sit and read the game program while the coach is talking to you!
  • Pay attention – lean in and listen intently.

One thing you can do that would be VERY helpful and insure you “hit the ground running” at your first meeting, is to have a “dress rehearsal” by doing some role playing. After you have thought through your answers to the above questions, and thought about the questions you want to ask, see if your high school coach or parent will help. It may sound silly, but it will prove dividends. Like anything else, practicing, from the opening handshake and introduction, to the conclusion of the meeting, will improve your performance. Every time you meet with a college recruiter, your performance will be better than the previous time. You want to make sure you impress every time – first to last.

The last pieces of advice that I gave every prospect I spoke with:

  • Find out everything you can about every college and football program that expresses an interest in you. Ask questions, difficult questions, investigate, and ultimately make a decision based on what you find out and what is important to you and your family.
  • Have Fun! Enjoy the process. You have put yourself in the position where good schools and good football programs are interested in you.

As always, questions and comments are welcome – feel free to join in the discussion!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – Make a “WOW” Highlight Video

I have a pretty good perspective on this topic.  As a college coach at the University of Central Missouri and William Jewell College, I was recruiting in the era of VHS tapes.  I had to literally go from school to school and pick up videotapes (game and highlights) of athletes or leave a postage paid packet for them to mail the video to our office.  Players and coaches at that time had to physically sit with two VHS recorders and manually punch a button to record from one to another to make a highlight video.

My son played and was recruited during the era that video was computer based and DVD’s were used to record games and highlights.  Most schools used a system like DSV or other similar editing systems.  To make his highlight video, he had to schedule times to sit with his high school coach at a computer to record highlights from the original computer game files.  Every athlete wanting to make a highlight DVD had to go through this process! This was only slightly better than the VHS to VHS method, but easier to copy and send after an original was made.

hudl-1440x900Now as a high school coach using the web based program Hudl , things have really changed for the better.  It is now easier than ever for an athlete, parent, or coach to make a highlight video from your own computer and send it instantly via email to any recruiting coach or school that requests it.

 

Using improved technology, putting together a great highlight video can help get your foot in the door and your name on the colleges list.  Here are my suggestions for marketing yourself and making your highlight video.

  1. Do it yourself, don’t pay a service.  As I said, it is now easier than ever to do this using Hudl.
  2. Use your schools videotape, not a handheld video your mom or dad took of your Pop Warner games.
  3. Your highlight video should be 15-20 plays, not 50-100.  Pick your VERY best plays – what I call WOW Plays; plays that make the coach watching say to himself WOW, I need to see more of this guy”. If they are NOT outstanding, but just average play after average play, he will pass.
  4. Pick plays that highlight your athletic ability  – that exhibit the remarkable (the Purple Cow) qualities that you have. This advice is not just for “skilled” positions.  If you are a lineman, pick some plays that show you running, changing direction, and exhibiting flexibility.
  5. No music or fancy fades between plays.  The coach has a limited amount of time and doesn’t want to be entertained, but wants to evaluate you.  An arrow or circle around you at the beginning of the play is OK – it will help the coach find you quickly.  Hudl has a cool feature that makes it easy to do this and can be seen here:  Hudl Highlight Tutorial
  6. Put one or two complete games on after your highlight.  In addition to your highlight video, a college coach will also want to see a complete game of you.    It should go without saying to select your best, games.  If it is against good competition, then that is even better.  The recruiting coach will be familiar with the better football programs in your area.
  7. Make it easy on yourself and start this at the beginning of the season.  After each game, pick 5-10 of your best plays and mark them.  Hudl makes it very easy to do this.  At the end of the season, you can then go through the 50-100 plays you already have marked and pick your 15-20 best plays of the season.  Figure out what your two best games, against the best competition were, and your recruiting packet will be ready to send to interested coaches.  If you wait until the season is over to begin this process, you may not have these ready when a college coach asks for them.
  8. Make sure you have all the correct information (phone, email, address, academic information) on Hudl.  This helps the college coach who has a limited amount of time and needs to evaluate thousands of prospects.  He will have all of your information AND your video right at his fingertips, and that will increase the likelihood of him following up with you and your family.

Market yourself – Make a WOW highlight video using the tools at your disposal.  Ask your coach if you need help, or drop me an email or leave a comment.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

 

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Recruiting – Get a “Great Motor”

This excerpt from my eBook “How to Become….. Wanted… and Rewarded. – Take Control and Market Yourself- The Complete Guide to a Successful Recruiting Experience”, is all about effort.

 “The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will.”   Vince Lombardi

lombardiThe next quality to discuss, the next quality that will set you apart from all the other high school athletes wanting to get a college scholarship, the next quality that will make you a remarkable recruit, a Purple Cow recruit is effort.

As was discussed in earlier recruiting posts, it is very important for you to “show up” on film; show your speed (Purple Cow Quality #2-Speed) , and athletic ability (Be a Quick Purple Cow), and show that you can play fast (Playing Fast!).  In addition, if you really want to stand out, show recruiters that you play with great effort!

During my collegiate coaching and recruiting days (University of Central Missouri and William Jewell College) , one of the biggest compliments that I would give when analyzing film on potential college football players was that they had a “great motor”.  It was a compliment that I did not give often, because it is a quality that unfortunately does not show up that often.  When I saw it on film, it was remarkable, and I took note. It is also why most recruiters (me included) want to see a complete game video along with a highlight film.  Most players can go back through a seasons worth of games and come up with a few good plays to slap together into a “highlight” video; playing consistently with great effort and technique, play after play during the course of a game is not as easy to do.  Often players get exposed.

Many consider it a character issue if players take a play off  – that it displays a lack of character.  Normally I do not think that is the case.  I think it is the norm.  Most high school players do not really understand what it means to go hard EVERY play.

I think the opposite IS true, though.

While effort really has nothing to do with athletic ability, I think it does show that you have good practice habits, have developed good character, and are “in shape“.  I don’t believe that playing with great effort, having a “great motor” is something that a player can just “flip on”.  It is a habit that they have developed over days, months, and years of doing it consistently in practice. If an athlete plays with great effort – has a “great motor” – it exhibits great character.  It is remarkable, and recruiters will notice.  I did.

In addition to these written posts, I have recently launched my YouTube Channel that deals specifically with the recruiting process.  The channel can be found here : The YouCanDoMore YouTube Channel, and the complete playlist can be viewed here.

 

Any Questions? Just leave a comment or email.

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Does a Purple Cow Have to Be Big?

The next Purple Cow quality to discuss, the next quality that will help you stand out from the other 250,000 high school seniors playing football is Size.

yardstick-foldingWithout a doubt, most college recruiters use a “yardstick” (mostly unspoken) when they are measuring the size of high school athletes.  I do acknowledge that in some sports, and some positions within a sport, size is important.  If all other factors are even, then typically college coaches will opt for the athlete with the better “frame”.  No matter how good a football player you are, no matter how quick and fast, or how good you are academically, if you are a 5’ 10” offensive lineman, you are probably not going to get recruited as a NCAA FBS offensive lineman.  You cannot change how tall you are, BUT you can optimize your overall size to get the attention, to stand out, to be remarkable, even if you are a 5’ 10” offensive lineman.  This way, even if you don’t measure up to the FBSyardstick” there are other levels and programs that may have an interest in you.

They key, really, is lean muscle mass.  You want functional weight; weight that will make you run faster, jump higher, be more explosive.  Gaining weight for weights sake, non-functional weight, body fat, will not make you remarkable.  It will slow you down.  The most common mistake I saw when freshmen athletes reported for two-a-day practices was that they spent all summer “getting big” and did not concentrate on running, speed, quickness and agility.  In regards to college athletes, and especially defensive college football players, I would rather exchange speed for size rather the other way around.

Exercise_zonesOptimizing your lean muscle mass will require some work and effort. If you need to lose body fat, and gain lean muscle mass, it actually is two separate tasks.  Contrary to popular belief body fat does not magically turn into muscle mass if you lift weights.  Probably the best, most efficient way to lose body fat is through aerobic exercise.  In order for an activity to be classified as aerobic, you need to elevate your heart rate into your training heart rate zone, and keep it elevated for a minimum of about 12 minutes.  Walking, jogging, treadmill work, all could accomplish this. Completing the weight workout (A Weekly (not weakly!) Workout) will not accomplish this, but will increase your muscle mass and functional strength.  If you are trying to lose body fat and increase lean muscle mass, a combination of aerobic exercise and a dynamic strength-training program (along with sensible eating habits) will give you the best results.

There is also a group of people who are naturally lean that have just as hard a time putting weight on as some do taking it off.  My suggestion for this group (along with a dynamic strength and conditioning program) is eating more meals a day, rather than eating more each meal.  Just gulping protein shakes and eating chips will not get the needed results.  In addition to your three regular meals a day, squeeze in a mid-morning and bedtime meal.  Along with (not in place of) a couple of your meals add a low fat, high protein drink.  Try to make each meal balanced with high calorie, low fat, and high protein content.  Remember, it is functional weight you want to put on, not body fat.  A good daily workout and balanced diet will help with this.

There is no magic bullet for either of these groups; drinking protein drinks and taking creatine will not by themselves “get you big”.  And remember size is only ONE of the Qualities we have talked about so far that will make you stand out from the crowd… that will make you remarkable

In order to get remarkable size, Purple Cow size, it will take hard work.  But you can do it… You Can Do More!

Any Questions – Just Comment or Email!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com