Tools and Time

This week I had the opportunity to help out at my daughter-in-law’s project called 50/50.   Her team is putting an art gallery in the West Bottoms of Kansas City made out of shipping containers.

Stay with me…. this isn’t about an art gallery.

Here are some things that came up during my work at the 50/50 project one evening…

  • They commented that “the new Phillips head drill bits made it a lot easier to set the sheet rock screws without stripping them out”.
  • We had a box of long drywall screws, but ran out of the shorter screws (which they preferred using) … so we went around picking up short ones that had been previously dropped on the floor and used them. We ended up having enough to finish what we were working on.
  • We needed a drill bit extension to drill a hole into a tricky spot on a doorframe. We had to stop until we got one.
  • I had to run home and get tin snips to bring to the project site so we could cut the sheet rock corner bead.

Now, this team is doing tremendous work, but it really reminded how much time is saved by having the right tools…. good tools when you are working.

For football coaches, especially during our season, time is at a premium. The amount of hours in the day is same for all of us. Saving hours or minutes using good tools puts more time in your kitty…. time that can be used doing additional football or teaching prep (which is what most of us do!) OR maybe you could sneak in some additional family time.

Over the last three years I have shared a variety of football coaching/ organizational tools (all for free) via my web site, YouCanDoMore.net. These are tools and procedures that I trust, and have saved me countless hours over the years.

Here are my most popular (using views and downloads as a metric) categories of posts, with a little information about each:

Defensive Game Planning:

sample call sheet

My post, Defensive Game Planning – The Call Sheet, has been viewed over 10,000 times. If you Google “football defensive call sheet” my post is the third one listed, and the second one if you filter it for images. The Call Sheet we developed while I was at the University of Central Missouri is a great tool… but even more important than the single tool was the process we used for game planning.

Those procedures and ALL the tools we used can be found at this link – Defensive Game Planning – All Posts, Forms and Videos.   These posts on game planning have been viewed over 30,000 times with over 15,000 downloads of the tools and videos included in the Defensive Game Planning series.

Film Grading:

film grade sheet

We all look at video, and most of us grade it… practice, scrimmage, and game. I believe film evaluation can be one of the most powerful teaching tools at our disposal. While I was at UCM, we developed a tool that we used in grading our film. You can read about how we used the tool at this post, Film Grading Tool, and download the Excel template here, Film Grade Template.

We used this tool not only to evaluate our athletes, but also to evaluate how effective we have been as coaches and to self-scout. It tracks mistakes made, and defensive efficiency by front/ stunt and coverage. These posts have been viewed over 5,000 times and this template downloaded about 1,500 times. If you Google “excel film grading football” the two top hits are from these posts.

Practice Planning:

Practice 1

Every good coach that I have ever worked with has been meticulously organized regarding practice planning. A simple organization piece that can save you time during season is to have a practice plan template.   You can read about the template we developed at UCM at these posts, Practice, Not a Minute to Spare,  Running an Effective Drill, and EDD’s- Every Day Drills.

You can download the template we used at this link, Excel Practice Plan Template. These practice-planning posts have been viewed over 1,000 times and the template downloaded 600 times.

As I mentioned, all of this is free. It was all shared with me, either partially or in its entirety… and they are all customizable with just a little Excel knowledge.

The single thing that I will ask, that if you read the post, download the file(s) or click the links, please leave a comment. I would love to hear your thoughts on these subjects…

  • Do you like the ideas?
  • What tools do you use in your program?
  • How could I tweak them to make them better?

As always, if you have a question just shoot me an email or tweet… I will respond!

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you… Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Saving Our Sport

Let me preface this by saying I love football.

I loved playing football.

I love coaching football.

I love practicing football… did as a player… do as a coach.

But…. I am truly worried about the future of our sport… for a number of reasons. As I wrote about last year (History Lesson) our game is under siege… and the battle has not lessened over the past year.

  • Concussions…
  • Decreasing numbers of participants…
  • Bad behavior (leading to bad press) by student/ professional athletes…

Here are some things to think about.

I can’t believe I am saying this… and it may be considered blasphemous, but I will just go ahead and get this out first. The 25 summer contact days allowed in our state (Missouri) is too much. By judiciously using the days, combining them with summer strength and conditioning days (which don’t count for your 25) a coach can effectively add three months to football “season”.

We are talking about a season… with pads… and practice… and scrimmages… and contact… that now lasts nearly seven months!

I think it is too much for the players, too much for parents, and too much for the coaches …who often don’t get paid any additional stipend for their summer work.

When you multiply that summer commitment required by students and their families for players who are multi sport athletes, it becomes an even crazier schedule… especially in those schools where each sport uses all of their 25 contact days.

We tell our athletes that we want them to be multi-sport athletes, but this model makes it nearly impossible.

On the same subject (25 summer contact days) let me just say that the MSHSAA required acclimatization period (first three days of practice helmets only) is obsolete. Our kids can practice nearly all summer with pads, but then when practice “officially” starts they have to go back to helmets only… it makes no sense.

safe footballThe emphasis on concussions and head injuries increases daily.   It is a hot-button issue at all levels. It is changing the nature of our sport, and we as coaches will need to adapt our coaching and teaching styles.

I am not sure what the best solutions are for this problem, but here are some thoughts…

First, I think that we, as coaches, need to be more proactive regarding these issues….

We need to effectively communicate to parents, administrators, community, and media:

  1. The value of our sport, football, and how we teach life lessons, character, healthy lifestyle, and leadership to our student-athletes. We teach more than X’s and O’s. If you have not seen them, here are a couple of excellent pieces by John Harbaugh of the Ravens and Chris Creighton, head coach at Eastern Michigan.
  1. We care about the safety of our athletes. We teach how to play the game safely. We are trained to recognize the symptoms of concussion and head injuries, and we will not put your child at risk.
  1. We have the best equipment. We recondition and recertify our equipment each year and replace when needed.

I think the tough, challenging, part of this situation is how to strike a balance between teaching what needs to be taught before you line up and play Friday night, and how to keep your athletes as safe as possible

Football is a physical game… that is part of what makes it a great sport. Your players have to know how to tackle, block, hit, and be hit, in order to play safely and play well. It may take some out-of-the-box thinking and ideas to teach them these skills and give them enough reps and time to be successful on Friday night.   I wrote about some ideas in these posts, Adaptation, and The Highest Quality Mental Reps.

I don’t have the answers, but I know collectively as a group… we as coaches will find the answers in order to keep our sport healthy and strong.

Thanks to PrepsKC.com for featuring this post (and my posts weekly during the season) on their site.  If you get a chance, check them out for great content regarding football in the Metro KC area!

Good luck to everyone this season, I am looking forward to watching your teams compete!

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you… Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

400m Track Workouts in Excel

I have always enjoyed Track and Field… as a competitor and coach. I was actually a head Track coach prior to being a head Football coach. As mentioned in yesterday’s post, I have coached Track and Field at every public school that I have been at.   At the collegiate level, although I did not coach Track, I had a keen interest in it. This is a picture of my son and me during a track meet at UCM when I was on the football staff there.

carter trackToday I am going to share a workout for 400m runners.   Philosophically, I believe that developing a pool of 400m runners can be the keystone for a successful Track and Field program. The best programs that I have coached, we had a strong core group of athletes that could run the 400m.

From that group we typically had some that we ran “up” in the 800m run, and some that we ran “down” in the shorter sprint races. From this group we could also fashion many of our relay teams.

This workout for 400m runners is based on work and research done by many successful Track and Field coaches, but borrows most from Clyde Harts work. Coach Hart was the long time Head Track and Field Coach at Baylor University, which earned the reputation as “Quarter-Mile-U”.

Coach Hart’s 400m workouts contain eight different components:

  1. Speed Endurance
  2. Tempo Endurance
  3. Strength Endurance
  4. Endurance Running
  5. Power Speed
  6. Event Running
  7. Speed
  8. Strength

The workout I am sharing (actually an Excel workbook) focuses on the Speed Endurance and Tempo Endurance components of Coach Hart’s 400m workout plan.  To download the workbook, click on this link : 400m Workout Workbook, or the picture below

sprint workbook

In a Speed Endurance workout, the runner incurs a high oxygen debt, and a lactic acid buildup. The emphasis is on quality, not quantity; with almost full recovery between runs.   Distances of these training runs can vary from 100m to 600m, with the total distance run during a workout being about 1000m.

A Tempo Endurance workout is aerobic, which will help the 400m runners increase their oxygen uptake, which helps shorten recovery time. In addition, these workouts help the runner learn rhythm (tempo) and also help train the body to increase production of phosphate… a primary energy source. The pace of these workouts is slower, with a shorter rest period, and more emphasis on quantity.

What I have tried to do with this workbook is to take these concepts from coach Hart and put them into an editable workout workbook. There is a tab for Speed Endurance workouts and a tab for Tempo Endurance workouts. Each workout is based on the runners 400m time, with the target times to hit based on calculations from this time.

I tried to make the workbook flexible, so that a coach would have a variety of workouts, with target times all based on the athletes 400m time:

  • Tempo Endurance workouts with Intervals of 100m, 200m, 300m, and 400m and intensities between 80% and 95%.
  • Speed Endurance workouts with Intervals of 100m, 200m, 300m, and 400m and intensities between 90% and 100%.

For example, in this Tempo Endurance workout, the athlete would run 5-8 (you would decide on the amount) 200m intervals, with a target time of 30 seconds (based on a 400m time of 54) with about a 2 minute recovery time.

sample workout

The calculations for the target times are not exact… the formula calculates what their estimated 100m, 200m, or 300m time would be (based on their 400m time) and figures the percentage for their target time from that. That being said, I always liked giving my athletes specific times to hit, rather than just say “run this at about 80% effort.”

The worksheets are editable… you can plug whatever 400m times you want to derive the workout from (in the 400 Time row) and the worksheet will calculate the corresponding workout.  This short tutorial describes some of the features of the 400m sprint workout workbook.  Click on the image below to start… if you click on HD in the upper right hand corner as it is playing, the quality is much better.

 

If you have any questions or comments about the 400m Workout Workbook, just shoot me an email… I will answer!

Related Posts:

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

“Back in my day…”

Last Saturday as I pulled out my phone to help guide me to a location I was not quite sure of, my thoughts drifted back to my early days recruiting at the University of Central Missouri, and how much technology has impacted that job. I have written at length regarding how technology has changed various aspects of our profession… game planning, practice planning, video evaluation, etc.   Many things we take for granted today that make our lives (and jobs) easier were not available in 1987 when our staff hit the recruiting trail.

OK, I have become that guy… “back in my day we had to walk to school every day, uphill both ways in a blizzard”… I have become that coach… “back in my day we didn’t have no stinkn’ Google Maps”.

Here are a few of the changes:

phone boothCell phones? We didn’t have them… In order to contact a coach (or a prospect) while on the road you became an expert at where the payphones were located… and not just any old payphones, but the kind you could drive up to and call from you car. It was frustrating… you could not retry the number every 5 minutes from your Bluetooth enabled smartphone while driving. You had to pull off the road, find a phone, look up the number on a printed contact sheet and hope that they were available.

Google Maps? Nope…. there was no pleasant voice giving us turn-by-turn directions as we drove. We usually had either a Mapco street guide (a huge book with about 100 different maps of about 3-4 city block on each page), or a giant folding map of the city. Both were cumbersome and impossible to use while driving. You had to figure out your best routes the night before and hope that the map was not dated too badly.

Hudl recruiting packages? Nada… Remember VHS tapes? We tried to get 2-3 game tapes for each athlete that we wanted to evaluate. Multiply that by 4-5 schools a day, and 3-4 days per week, and we came home each recruiting trip with easily 40-50 videotapes. With 6 or more of us on the road, the process of copying the tapes was a never-ending job for the people back in the office.

The NCAA Clearinghouse? HA… It wasn’t in place in the 80’s. At that time, each school certified their own athletes regarding eligibility… meaning, that for each prospect we were recruiting we had to obtain (from the counselor) a transcript for each student, and a list of core courses for that school. We then had to calculate each student’s Core GPA to determine their eligibility.

And there is much more… text messaging, email blasts, Facebook, twitter feeds… on and on. But my wife reminded me of an accompanying truth – Being teachers and coaches, as each new technological breakthrough brings us a few extra minutes or hours, we just invest that time in another aspect of our job… it is what we do… we will not ever have “spare” time. I am not complaining… I am chuckling!

Related posts:

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Your Toolbox

My father was many things (US Marine, WWII vet of the Pacific Campaign) but a skilled carpenter, handyman, craftsmen he was NOT. Although he never scrimped on material, his attempts at various projects were usually laughable, amateurish, and cobbled together…. not masterpieces in any sense of the word.

My dad literally had one small toolbox that contained:

toolbox

  • 1 phillips head screwdriver, 1 flat head
  • 1 pair of pliers
  • 1 pair of vice grips (his “go-to” tool)
  • 1 regular (small) hammer, 1 ball peen hammer
  • 1 hand saw for wood, 1 hack saw for metal

And little else.

So while he often courageously attempted ambitious projects, with little or no instructions, and only a meager set of tools at his disposal, the results usually came up far short of his expectations.

When I told a lifelong friend (who knew my father and witnessed his “handiwork”) that I had just finished installing built in cabinets and closets in our bedroom, adding a sliding factory door, and laying hardwood floor in our loft, he looked at me and asked “since when did you become so handy?”

Here is the difference between my father and me… I am not smarter, nor do I use better materials. The main difference is that I have more tools in my toolbox, and availability to better instructions.

I have two large cases full of tools… sets of wrenches, power tools, tools for measuring, cutting, fastening, etc. I also have access to great instructions for any project I tackle via the Internet.

As coaches we all have similar “material” (our squad) but some of us have more tools at our disposal. A craftsman has to have the correct tools to create a masterpiece.

What tools do you have in your coaching “toolbox”?  Here are some that have helped me be a more efficient and effective coach:

All told, the links listed above have been downloaded over 10,000 times by coaches all over the world. I am not suggesting these are all or the best tools out there… but plenty of tools ARE out there… and fairly easy to find.

Create a masterpiece!

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Is Luckey, “lucky”?

In my post last week, Lessons from the Tech Industry, I mentioned Palmer Luckey, the inventor of Oculus Rift, and how this technology is being used in athletics and coaching by the company, Eon Sports VR (see post, The Highest Quality Mental Reps)

I am traveling today, and during a quick stop in the airport bookstore, I noticed that there were no less than three magazines that were featuring Palmer Luckey:

palmer luckey

Pretty impressive stuff for a 21 year old gamer… a 21 year old gamer who exhibited great genius, persistence and determination in solving a series of problems that had stumped others in the virtual reality field.

While some may say that Luckey was “lucky”, I am reminded of a couple of quotes:

  • “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration” – Thomas Edison
  • “The harder I work, the luckier I get” – Samuel Goldwyn

I hope you can get a chance to check out one of the articles… there is much that can be learned.

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

A Significant Football Resource

Today’s post is significant for three reasons…

  • I am reviewing a great offensive football coaching resource, The Zone Offense: Create a Structured System
  • I am highlighting some innovative methods available to better teach whatever offensive or defensive system you use
  • I am introducing an outstanding coaching resource, Coach Keith Grabowski

zone offeseCoach Grabowski’s new iBook, The Zone Offense: Create a Structured System is one of the best coaching resources that I have ever read…. and you really do so much more than read it… you read it, you watch it, you interact with it, you take notes in it.  It is a coaching clinic, webinar, PowerPoint, film session, drill guide, tutorial, etc… all rolled into one coaching resource.  It really is as if you had the opportunity to spend a week (or more!) with Coach Grabowski, his staff, and players when he was at Baldwin Wallace University.

Coach Grabowski starts at the beginning and details the philosophy behind their version of the Zone offense, goes through their terminology, (formations, adjustments, etc) and personnel considerations.  He then takes their stretch play and details, for every position group, how to teach, install, practice (including practice organization and drill work) and analyze (via video analysis) their role for that play.

This video is one example of the kind of powerful resource this iBook is.   This piece shows how the iBook takes you through the initial explanation of offensive line combo blocks for the stretch, a drill introduction, and actual practice video of the drill being executed.

This video shows how the iBook explains an adjustment of the tailbacks path on the stretch play.

The final chapters put it all together and discuss (and show via game video) intricacies of the play vs a myriad of defensive fronts.

It is important to note, that although this iBook is optimized for viewing on an iPad, it can also be “read” on a Mac using the new Mavericks operating system.

If you are running, or want to run the zone scheme as part of your offense, then this book is a must have.  If you are not using any zone concepts in your offense (or you are a defensive coach) this book still has much to offer.  This book is a roadmap, a template, for using technology to better teach your athletes.   It is comprehensive, interactive, and incorporates many different teaching styles, to accommodate all types of learners.

If none of this appeals to you… you are not interested in the zone concepts, not interested in using technology to help teach and coach your athletes, then at a bare minimum I would follow and read Coach Grabowski’s blog : Coach and Coordinator.  It is an excellent resource on a variety of topics ranging from offensive football, to game planning, and leadership development.

I hope this post has done this iBook and Coach Grabowski justice… it is an amazing resource for running the zone scheme, it is a great example of using technology to better teach and coach your system, and Coach Grabowski is a true innovator regarding “On Edge Coaching”

You can purchase Coach Grabowski’s iBooks at these links: The Zone Offense: Create a Structured System, and his first book, 101+ Pro Style Pistol Offense Plays

You can follow his blog at this link: Coach and Coordinator, and follow his Twitter feed here: @CoachKGravbowski 

Related Posts:

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

The Highest Quality Mental Reps

Mental reps….

Quality mental reps…

The highest quality mental reps…

There are limitations to the number of actual, physical reps that your athletes can take during the week.

  • Access to fields and equipment
  • Practice time
  • Access to other players to compete against
  • Fatigue
  • Access to coaches
  • Increased risk of injury

In a previous post, Adaptation, I wrote about how, with the changing nature of our sport, it will become increasingly important for coaches to come up with new and better ways to mentally prepare our athletes for peak contest performance. One way to do that is for the athlete to take mental reps along with their physical reps.

Mental Reps

The problem with mental reps is, well, they are mental. Being such, there are limitations to their effectiveness. In the past, in order to see positive results of taking mental reps, a player had to rely on a great imagination, concentration, or a great mental visualization process (see my post on Mental Visualization). It is a tough skill for a 15-21 year old kid with a lot on their mind and limited time to develop.

Quality Mental Reps

In my post, Adaptation, I shared a technique we have used for years to get quality mental reps during the week. You can read in detail about this teaching technique here (Adaptation) but in essence we try to construct a crude virtual reality setting by using a large area with an overhead projector. We arrange 11 desks (or chairs, or have the athletes stand) facing the screen, roughly in our defensive alignment… 4 desks up front for the DL, 3 behind those for the LB’s, and 2 desks outside for the corners, and 2 behind for the safeties. We run through a script, projecting an endzone shot of the plays on the screen, giving our players a down and distance situation for each play. We signal, communicate all calls, and mentally play the play.

This technique works well, but as I said, it is a relatively crude attempt at virtual reality. It is 3rd person NOT 1st person.

The Highest Quality Mental Reps

This past week I had an opportunity to see the future… a future that is available to coaches now through a system called EON Sports VR – Virtual Reality Training… and there is nothing crude about this product. Their software SIDEKIQ is a Virtual Reality Training software for football that allows coaches to replicate game-like plays, scenarios, and situations.

 

Brendan Reily (@EONSportsVR), the CEO of the Kansas City based company, gave me a great demonstration of the powerful teaching system. Brendan, a Kansas City product himself, was a former GA for Bill Self at KU, and developed this product with help from some of the leading football programs in the country.

With the EON Sports VR system, coaches have the ability to create a virtual reality football arena using their playbook and/ or their game film. Using the SIDEKIQ software, coaches can do this themselves, or have the team at EON Sports do this conversion for them (for a fee).

The system is nothing short of amazing. As a coach, you can convert plays from your game film to a virtual 3 dimensional platform. If you have ever created a play using PlayMaker Pro or Hudl, getting your team into a 3D virtual reality playing arena using SIDEKIQ is a piece of cake.

 

Now here is the main difference.  Once the play is animated and rendered in 3D,  instead of watching from an endzone or pressbox perspective, your athletes can get completely immersed in the play…. they can watch from the QB’s perspective, or see the play from the LB’s helmet…. or the helmet of any other player on the team.

It is as if you are in the play…. It is total immersion…. it is from a 1st person perspective… It is the highest quality mental rep.


Watching the play is intuitive, using a computer screen, projector or even better, the OculusVR, a virtual reality headset.

oculus

This software/ hardware system is poised to revolutionize teaching and coaching, much in the same way Hudl did with film exchange and evaluation 5-6 years ago. It is potentially a game changer ….

 

The videos that I have embedded really do not do the EON Sports VR Training system complete justice.  I suggest contacting Brendan to set up a demonstration… I promise you will not be sorry!  Tell him you read about it here at YouCanDoMore.net!

Did you know 2 of the 3 founders of Hudl were from KC as well?

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

Augmented Reality and Coaching

Most of us have heard of virtual reality… virtual reality replaces the real world with a computer generated simulated one.  By contrast, augmented reality (AR) is a live, copy, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented (or supplemented) by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. The app and platform Aurasma allows users to unlock digital content from the world around them through the use of a phone or tablet.

It is a little difficult to explain, but fairly easy to see in action.

Here is an example.

I have this picture of two students jumping rope.

pat jump rope

I have this video (.mov file) of the two students actually demonstrating the various jump rope drills.

Lets say I have a printed picture of the students jumping rope laying on my kitchen counter right now… which I actually do!

The app Aurasma can link the video file, overlaying it via phone or tablet onto the actual picture … augmenting the “real” picture sitting on my counter with the video.

Here is Aurasma doing just that:

The Aurasma  app works with a tablet or phone in exactly the same way.  Here is a video showing the same trigger picture and video using a phone… you will also see in this video that you can “layer” overlays so that different commands “single tap” or “double tap” will perform different functions…. In this example a double tap will take the user to my blog post about these jump rope drills.

Cool technology… but how could you use it in coaching and teaching?

Here is a simple example… I printed pictures of the 4 Core lifts we do in class.  I put the pictures on a bulletin board in the weight room.  Lets say the students had a quick question regarding technique, spotting, or what muscle groups the lift worked.  They could pop over to the board, scan the picture using the Aurasma app and get a quick tutorial on the lift.

Some other possible uses – trigger image and overlay (video, image, or website) for each of these

  • One for each piece of equipment in your weight room…
  • One showing the muscle groups worked on each lift…
  • One detailing each station in a fitness circuit…
  • One showing complimentary auxiliary lifts for each core lift…
  • One showing medicine ball drills …
  • One showing resistance band drills…

Like any other use of technology, these things will not replace the teaching and coaching you do, but supplement (augment) it.

Later this week a step by step tutorial on using the Aurasma platform.

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com

“Passing” and “Catching” Information in a Connected Society

It is funny the circuitous route information sometimes takes getting from the “quarterback” to the “receiver”.

  • A couple of weeks ago, a startup education tech company, Dewsly (@dewsly), sent me a tweet about their platform, because I was a teacher and coach …
  • We began following each other on twitter…
  • The CEO of Dewsly, Anthony Noll (@anthonynoll) and I began following each other on twitter…
  • I created a Dewsly account and began investigating their platform…
  • Anthony Noll began following this blog (YouCanDoMore.net)…
  • I wrote a post about technology and teaching/ coaching (Technology and Your Career) a couple of days later…
  • Anthony Noll tweeted the following… “@youcandomore1 took a look at your site and love it. i wish content like that was around when i was an athlete. lets talk sometime!” 
  • I wrote a post on my blog,  “Flipped Coaching Tips and Resources
  • The tweet referencing the post got favorited and retweeted many times…. Including by @dewsly and @anthonynoll
  • Another follower of @dewsly and a user of their platform (dewsly.com), Lauren Taylor (@LTaylorELA) read the retweet from @dewsly and we started following each other on twitter…
  • I joined the Dewsly group, Teaching Tips, where teachers can easily share information and content…
  • I shared a link to my post on Flipped Coaching Tips and Resources with the Dewsly group, Teaching Tips 
  • In the Dewsly forum, Teaching Tips, Lauren Taylor shared information regarding a new technology called Aurasma, which is an Augmented Reality app and platform…

sharing-info

Without Twitter I would not have know about Dewsly… without Dewsly I would not have been connected to Lauren Taylor… without joining the Teaching Tips group, I would not have read about Aurasma via Lauren Taylor’s link…. and this is a tool that  I WILL use in my teaching and coaching.

Tomorrow I am going to write about, and demonstrate some uses for this app and platform, Aurasma…. in the words of my wife… “Prepare to have your mind blown!”

The point of post today’s post is to show how relatively easy it is, in today’s connected society, to be both a quarterback and “pass” some information…. or be a “receiver” and “catch” what is thrown your direction.

Go ahead… throw and catch!

Thanks to…

You Can Do More… your brain is lying to you…. Don’t Believe It!

Jeff Floyd – youcandomore1@yahoo.com